Terms

Results for "wood"

Abrasive (Sand) Blasting

Abrasive (sand) blasting is the process of forcibly propelling a stream of abrasive material against a surface under high pressure to smooth or polish a rough surface, roughen a smooth surface, shape a surface, or remove surface impurities. It consists of pressurized fluid, typically compressed air, that is used to propel a high-velocity stream of blasting material,…

American National Safety Institute (ANSI)

The American National Safety Institute (ANSI) is a private, non-profit membership organization that manages and regulates the development of voluntary safety standards for products and systems in the United States. Founded in 1918, ANSI and its members have laid the groundwork for national standardization and assessment frameworks in industries encompassing…

ASTM E84 Flammability

Explore Materials and Sample ASTM E84 Surface Burning Characteristics of Building Materials The ASTM E84 test is a standard of the American Society of Testing and Materials (ASTM) that measures the burning properties, or fire resistance, of building materials that may be exposed to flames using the Steiner tunnel chamber…

Balance

Balance is a wood panel matching method where the veneer width is uniform, creating a more consistent and symmetrical appearance. This method can be used on different wood matches, such as random or book, as long as the veneer widths are equal throughout. This method produces veneer yield and is…

Bamboo

Explore Materials and Sample Bamboo refers to a manufactured cellulose fiber that is made from bamboo pulp with a solvent spun process. As part of rayon fiber family, bamboo fiber can be produced in filament or staple form. It is not inherently antibacterial. Bamboo is a renewable resource and is…

Bear Scratches

Bear scratches are abnormalities formed from indented growth rings on the tangential face of wood, which look like a scratch from a bear’s claw—hence the name. They are commonly found in Sitka spruce.…

Bee’s Wing

A bee’s wing is a type of wood figuring that typically appears in Indian satinwood, narra, mahogany, and eucalyptus. The small-scale, tight form resembles the wing of a bee, hence the name.…

Bevel Edge

A bevel edge is a straight planer cut added to the edges of a surface. According to the National Wood Flooring Association (NWFA), this cut should be at or around a 45-degree angle and greater than a .045-inches in depth. It can be created on different flooring and surface materials…

Biodegradation

Biodegradation is the breakdown or decomposition of materials by microorganisms. It refers to the processes that transform materials into less complex compounds that can be used and reused by living systems. Biodegradation is used for waste management and environmental remediation, also known as bioremediation. It is an important process that…

Bird’s Eye

Explore Materials and Sample A bird’s eye is a type of wood figuring with a distinct swirling pattern in the grain that leads to the formation of small circular figures—or eyes—on the tangential face. Bird’s eyes are most often found in hard maple, as the logs are typically rotary cut…

Bleach Cleanable

Explore Materials and Sample Bleach cleanable is a common cleaning instruction for textiles. It usually comes with detailed dilution instructions as well as the applicable bleach type. There are two different types of bleach: chlorine bleach and oxygen bleach or non-chlorine bleach. Chlorine bleach can disinfect, oxidize, and deodorize textiles,…

Blister

Blister is a wood figure that appears short and straight with raised sections. A blister looks similar to a quilt and fiddleback figure, except that it does not appear as oval as quilt or as long as fiddleback. This figuring is a direct result from cutting across uneven growth rings…

Book Match

Book match is considered the most commonly used wood match. Every other consecutive veneer leaf is flipped on the vertical and butted, creating a mirrored effect similar to an opened book. It creates a symmetrical pattern that accentuates the grain and wood figuring of the log. Book match can be…

BREEAM

Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method, or BREEAM, was the world’s first widely used green building certification system. Developed in the 1990s in the UK by Building Research Establishment (BRE), today BREEAM is used in over 80 countries.1 BREAAM certification demonstrates a building project’s sustainability and its commitment to protecting…

Broken Fiddleback

Broken fiddleback is a type of wood figuring that is similar to a fiddleback wood figure except it does not cross the whole leaf of the board, giving it a broken effect.…

Broken Stripe

Broken stripe refers to a wood figure that looks like stripes running down the veneer, but in a broken or faded pattern. The stripe lines are not consistently visible throughout, allowing for the broken line appearance. It can sometimes appear similar to a ribbon stripe or a broken ribbon.…

Bullnose

Bullnose is a term most commonly used to describe ceramic tile that is distinguished by rounded edges primarily appears as decorative trim. The format is often used to frame the perimeter of a tiled wall or create a transition between the tile and the wall, so that unfinished tile sides…

Bullnose Edge

Bullnose is an edge type is rounded and finished to match the main surface. A full bullnose edge is curved on the top and bottom and will look like a “U” turned on its side. Bullnose edges can come in other forms, such as a half bullnose, which is rounded…

Burl

A burl is a tree growth in which the grain has grown in a deformed, goiter-like manner. It can be found on all parts of the tree, including the trunk, base, or a branch filled with knots. Caused when a tree has undergone a form stress, such as injury, insect…

California Air Resources Board (CARB)

Explore Materials and Sample California Air Resources Board (CARB) is a committee within California’s Environmental Protection Agency whose role is to protect the public from exposure to air pollution. This includes setting statewide emission standards for pollution sources ranging from auto emissions to consumer products. Formaldehyde, a toxic air contaminant…

California Prop 65 List

The California Prop 65 List is a public index of naturally occurring and synthetic chemicals that are known to cause cancer and reproductive harm. This list was established by Proposition 65—a law officially known as the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986—to inform Californians about potential exposure…

CAN/ULC-S102 Flammability

Explore Materials and Sample The CAN/ULC-S102 Surface Burning Characteristics of Building Materials and Assemblies test is the Canadian standard for the relative surface burning characteristics of interior finish materials, products, and assemblies used in building construction. Results obtained from this test are used by code officials in the acceptance of…

CAN/ULC-S104 Flammability

The CAN/ULC-S104 Fire Tests for Door Assemblies test is the Canadian standard for measuring fire resistance of door assemblies and individual components like doors, frames, hardware, glazing materials, and other parts.…

CDPH/CHPS 01350

Explore Materials and Sample CDPH (California Department of Public Health) / CHPS (Certified in Healthcare Privacy and Security) Section 01350 is a United States standard that addresses the human health and environmental impacts of building materials used by the architecture and design community. Also known as the Standard Method for…

Center

Center is a wood panel matching method. Similar to balance, center match has uniform veneer widths, creating a more consistent and symmetrical appearance. Different from the balance method, center matching requires that the wood grain pattern is centered on the panel, creating a different overall pattern. This method produces veneer…

Certification

A certification provides third-party confirmation that a product, project, process, or system fulfills the requirements of a given standard. Certification programs vary in method or philosophy. They can be divided into multi-attribute and single-attribute programs. A single-attribute certification focuses on just one factor, like water use, energy use, or chemical…

Chain of Custody (CoC)

Chain-of-Custody (CoC) is the process of following materials through each step of the supply chain in order to verify appropriate management, quality control, and safety. Along the supply chain, materials go through various stages of production, processing, shipping, and retail. CoC systems are made up of a series of procedures,…

Chevron

Explore Materials and Sample Chevron is a repeating pattern of a continuous V- and inverted V-shaped lines without interruption, resulting in a zig-zag-like appearance. Composed of at least one color, this pattern is often used in the design of flooring and walls, as well as textiles. Photography Courtesy of Walker…

Circular Economy

The Circular Economy is a framework that aims to reduce environmental impacts and generate economic growth by eliminating waste and reusing resources. This model is an alternative to the traditional linear economic system, which presumes the existence and accessibility of unlimited natural resources, and in which a product’s life cycle…

Cluster

Cluster refers to a wood figure that is similar to a burl wood figure but is always grouped together in smaller areas, or clusters. Surrounding the clusters are darker figurings that have a muscle-like appearance.…

Compliance

In the building industry, compliance means acting in adherence to a set of regulations, standards, or codes. It indicates that a product, project, or process fulfills all official requirements. Designers, manufacturers, and other professionals may need to demonstrate compliance to internal management, regulators, the government, customers, or independent third parties.…

Cradle to Cradle

Explore Materials and Sample Cradle to Cradle (C2C) is a product standard administered by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute (C2CPII) to incentivize environmentally and socially responsible manufacturing practices. Based on the principles outlined in their 2002 book, Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things, authors William…

Cradle to Cradle Basic Level Restricted Substances List (RSL)

The Cradle to Cradle (C2C) Basic Level Restricted Substances List (RSL) is a register of the chemicals that are banned from use in Cradle to Cradle Certified products above certain thresholds. These substances have been found to be harmful or toxic to the environment and human health.1 The RSL was…

Cradle to Cradle Material Health Certificate

The Cradle to Cradle (C2C) Material Health Certificate recognizes products that avoid the use of harmful chemicals or toxic materials, in accordance with Cradle to Cradle’s Certified Product Standard. The C2C product standard is administered by the Cradle to Cradle Products Innovation Institute (C2CPII) to incentivize environmentally and socially responsible…

Crotch

Crotch refers to a wood figure that appears when a cut is made from the joint connecting the tree’s trunk and its branch. It can have a wide range of appearances and usually the veneer leaves are smaller. The juncture connecting the trunk and branch creates an extreme form of…

Crown Moulding

Crown moulding refers to decorative cornice installed at the intersection of the ceiling and wall, which is constructed from wood, plaster, or other materials. This decorative moulding can give a ceiling the feeling of height. Crown moulding dates back to Egyptian times, and later in classical Greek and Roman architecture,…

Curly

Curly wood figuring refers to a primarily horizontal pattern that runs perpendicular to the wood grain. This creates a three-dimensional effect that gives the wood a wavy surface when light reflects off of it, as if there are curls or ripples in the grain. It is commonly found in maple…

Declaration

A declaration is a report that provides quantified, transparent information about a product’s environmental performance and material ingredients. It can be used by building industry professionals to facilitate comparison with similar products and to help manufacturers qualify for transparency credits in green building rating systems. Declarations can be published as…

Dentil Moulding

Dentil moulding refers to a decorative moulding that consists of a simple repetition of closely spaced, rectangular blocks. Dentil is derived from the Latin word dens, meaning teeth. This moulding is generally used below the cornice of the roof line, or along a fireplace mantel. It is a popular ornamentation…

Dimple

Dimple figuring in wood resembles little pockets or shallow holes on the tree bark. When cut, the wood veneer will have ring like shapes that resemble the dimples on the tree bark.…

Distressed

Explore Materials and Sample Distressed refers to a material that has simulated marks of age and wear or has been purposely blemished so as to give the appearance of long, steady use. It can be applied to wood, metal, textile, glass, and stone through many methods such as hammering, denting,…

Dog-Tooth Moulding

Dog-tooth moulding is an ornamental architectural element. The dog-tooth pattern consists of triangles, pyramids, or a petal-like designs connecting at the ends to form a diamond or square, that more often look like a sharp canine tooth. The dog-tooth moulding pattern stems from the Early Normal period (c.1066-1485 AD) and…

Eased Edge

Also referred to as a softened square, eased edge describes the technique of bordering countertops and other surfaces with rounded square edges, as opposed to sharp square cuts that can reveal unfinished layers of material. Stone, engineered stone, solid surfacing, and high-pressure laminate commonly employ eased edges to address both…

Egg and Dart Moulding

Egg and dart moulding refers to a type of decorative moulding, which consists of the simple repetition of an egg-shaped object—also called the echinus—interspersed with a V-shaped element such as an arrow, anchor, or dart that surrounds the echinus. This moulding is traditionally found at the top of ionic capitals,…

End Match

End match refers to a four-panel wood match sequence. The pattern starts with two wood veneers that are book matched, on the vertical, and then joined by two additional book matched veneers that are flipped, on the horizontal, creating an almost mirrored effect between the four panels. The grains are…

End-Grain Wood

Explore Materials and Sample End grain refers to the grain of wood that is exposed when timber is cut across the growth rings at a 90-degree angle, as opposed to a plank of wood that has been cut along the length of the trunk. End grain exposes the character of…

Engineered Hardwood Flooring

Explore Materials and Sample Engineered hardwood flooring is constructed from real wood slats that are adhered together in layers at opposing directions to form a plank. The cross-grain configuration minimizes expansion and shrinking, allowing for a tighter fit while installing and less movement after installation is complete. The two main…

Environmental Justice

Environmental Justice is the equitable distribution of environmental burdens and benefits, and of meaningful participation in environmental decision-making. This means that all people have the right to equal protection from environmental and health hazards, and the right to live, work, play, worship, or learn in safe, healthy communities.1 The US…

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is an agency of the United States federal government whose mission is to protect human health and the environment. It was established in 1970 to ensure that all Americans have access to clean air, land, and water, and that related federal laws are administered and…

EPA Chemicals of Concern

EPA Chemicals of Concern is a list compiled by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) containing chemical substances found to be harmful or toxic to human health and the environment. This list was published in accordance with a 2016 amendment to the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), which requires…

Fiddleback

Explore Materials and Sample Fiddleback wood figuring is a specific variation of a curly wood figure, where the curls are very tight and uniform. Its close grains and lines appear to swerve or ripple in varying patterns. It is commonly found in maple, sycamore, and walnut trees. Photography Courtesy of…

Figured

Figured refers to the surface effect and markings found on timber that give it a unique appearance. It can vary depending on many factors, including the wood’s grain, color, and the way it was cut. Types of figured effects include curly, fiddleback, and bird’s eye. Photography Courtesy of Wolf-Gordon…

Flake

Flake wood figuring appears when a wood species has heavy medullary ray growth. Medullary rays are a type of cellular structure found in some species of wood, which grows in a radial pattern perpendicular to the wood’s growth rings. Flake figuring will appear if you cut the wood parallel, or…

Flame

Flame refers to a wood figuring that is caused by a distortion in the wood fiber, which creates a wavy or flame-like lines. It is similar to fiddleback and curly wood figuring, but with more straight lines instead of a curled pattern. Flame figuring is commonly found in the maple…

Forest Stewardship Council (FSC Certified)

Explore Materials and Sample The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) is a German-based, international non-profit organization and certification framework working to promote responsible forest management. The FSC uses independent, third-party accredited certifiers to appraise operations and determine whether they comply to institutional standards. Two certification tracks are available: Forest Management Certification…

Formaldehyde

Formaldehyde is a volatile organic chemical (VOC) used as a preservative, disinfectant, and binding agent in the building industry.1 ­It has been designated as a carcinogen by the World Health Organization and California’s Proposition 65, and a Hazardous Air Pollutant by the US Environmental Protection Agency. It is a key…

Fumed Wood

Fumed wood refers to a wood coloring process where the wood planks are exposed to ammonia gas. The ammonia reacts with the wood tannin and changes the wood color, usually to a darker gray-brown color. Fumed wood can also be referred to as ‘smoked wood’. White oak is one of…

Ghost

Ghost refers to wood figuring that is commonly found in the maple species when a tree is infested with the ambrosia beetle. A fungus grows from the remains of the beetle larva and breaks down the wood into a compound for the larva to eat. When the tree is cut,…

Global Warming Potential

The Global Warming Potential (GWP) is a unit of measurement developed to compare the atmospheric global warming impacts of gases. It tells us how long a gas remains in the atmosphere, and how much energy it absorbs over a given time period, relative to 1 ton of carbon dioxide (CO2).…

GREENGUARD

Explore Materials and Sample The GREENGUARD Certification Program—previously known as the GREENGUARD Indoor Air Quality Certification—recognizes products and processes that meet standards for safe levels of chemical and particle emissions in indoor spaces. GREENGUARD is a third-party assessment program created by Underwriters Laboratories (UL) Environment to support manufacturers in producing…

GREENGUARD Gold

Explore Materials and Sample GREENGUARD is a third-party assessment program created by Underwriters Laboratories (UL) Environment to support manufacturers in producing safe products designed for indoor spaces, in accordance with strict VOC emissions standards. GREENGUARD Gold is even more rigorous, permitting no more than 1/100 of currently published ACGIH Threshold…

Health Product Declaration (HPD)

Explore Materials and Sample A Health Product Declaration (HPD) is a standardized report that is used to disclose the contents of building materials, as well as their possible human health effects and hazards. HPDs are overseen by the Health Product Declaration Collaborative (HPDC), a non-profit organization with members from across…

Heartwood

Explore Materials and Sample Heartwood refers to the wood that is at the core or center of a tree. It was formerly sapwood that died as the result of a chemical transformation that occurred when the tree strengthened to resist decay. In some tree species, the heartwood darkens making it…

Heavy Metals

Heavy metals are naturally occurring elements with high densities relative to water, which are toxic at low concentrations.1 They are part of an ill-defined subset of elements with metallic properties, usually categorized as metals or metalloids.2 In trace amounts, many of these elements are necessary to sustain life, but when…

IIC Rating

IIC, or Impact Insulation Class, is an acoustical rating that measures the sound insulation and transmission of impact noise, such as vibrations or footsteps, on a floor-ceiling assembly. The IIC rating of a floor product is expressed using whole numbers and is based on the entire assembly on which it…

Indoor Air Quality

Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) refers to the quality of air in and around buildings, as it affects human health and safety. Pollutants released into indoor air can cause adverse short- and long-term health effects. These effects have a disproportionate impact on at-risk populations like children, the elderly, asthmatics, low-income, minorities,…

Inlay

Inlay is a decorative technique that inserts pieces of contrasting materials into a depression or shallow surface in a base object to create an ornamental design, pattern, or picture. The inlaid material is usually made flush with the surface it has been added to. This technique is commonly seen in…

International Living Future Institute

The International Living Future Institute (ILFI), established in 2009 by members of the Cascadia Green Building Council, is a non-profit advocating for a socially just, culturally rich, and ecologically restorative society. As the umbrella organization tasked with managing the Living Building Challenge, the Living Product Challenge, the Living Community Challenge,…

Janka Hardness

The Janka hardness test is used to determine the strength of wood by measuring the resistance to denting and wear. The test method was developed by Gabriel Janka in 1906 and measures the force needed to embed a 11.28mm steel ball haft its depth into the sample of wood. In…

Knots

Explore Materials and Sample Knots on a tree are formed when branches—which are often smaller in size and located lower on the trunk—either break off or are cut off, and the outer layer or bark of the tree grows around or over the broken area. When the tree is cut,…

LEED

Explore Materials and Sample Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) is a third-party certification system and global standard for green buildings and communities. Developed by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), LEED is the world’s most widely used green building rating system. It provides the tools for building industry…

Life Cycle Assessment

Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a standardized set of procedures used to quantify the inputs, outputs, and potential environmental impacts of products or systems across their entire life cycle. LCAs promote the redesign and responsible design of products and processes to reduce harm to the environment.1 The life cycle is…

Live Sawn

Explore Materials and Sample Live sawn is a cutting technique in which wood logs are sliced through directly without turning the log. This is considered the most efficient way to cut lumber as it yields little to no waste and utilizes the most out of a log. Live sawn cut…

Low-Emitting

Explore Materials and Sample Low-emitting or low volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are reduced concentrations of chemical contaminants in manufactured goods that, at significant levels, can be harmful to human health and the environment. VOC emissions can be released from household products like paints, solvents, carpets, wood composites, and cleaning products,…

Marquetry

Marquetry is the process of configuring elaborately inlaid patterns for use as decorative cladding on furniture and decorative objects. Thin sheets of wood veneer, shell, glass, or other materials are cut into small pieces and affixed to a wood surface in a predetermined pattern—oftentimes complex geometric designs or graphic depictions…

Micro Bevel Edge

A micro bevel edge is similar to a bevel edge—a straight planer cut added to the edges of a surface—but falls within a tolerance measuring between .025-inches and .045-inches, as set forth by the National Wood Flooring Association (NWFA). A micro bevel edge offers ease of cleaning and maintenance and…

Microban

Microban is a proprietary antimicrobial and odor control agent developed by the company Microban International. Microban inhibits the growth and reproduction of bacteria, mold, and mildew throughout the entire lifecycle of a product by damaging or disrupting the internal systems of a microbe. It can be custom formulated to fit…

Mindful Materials

Explore Materials and Sample Mindful MATERIALS (mM) is a free online aggregator of sustainability information for design professionals and manufacturers. It was created in 2014 by HKS, an international architecture firm, as a user-friendly platform that promotes product transparency and optimization information across the industry. The mM L3C is a…

Mindful Materials Label

Explore Materials and Sample The mindful MATERIALS (mM) label is a physical sticker placed on product binders in resource libraries to communicate information about manufacturer transparency and optimization. Labels are designed to facilitate identification of products whose manufacturers disclose information about their impact on human health and the environment. Products…

Mohs Hardness Scale

The Mohs hardness scale is a scratch resistance test that can be applied to various minerals. It was created in 1812 by German geologist Friedrich Mohs and is one of several tests used to document mineral hardness. Minerals are rated on a scale of one through ten with each number…

Mottled

Mottled refers to a wrinkled, blotchy wood figure that is produced when a wavy grain in the wood combines with a spiral. It is similar to a curly wood figure, but the curl lines are more broken up.…

Nail Holes

Explore Materials and Sample Nail holes are often found in reclaimed or antique wood. The nail holes are created in wood planks from previous installations and are visible in the plank when removed and restored. Nail holes can add to the character of reclaimed wood. Depending on the installation method,…

Parquetry

Parquetry refers to the process of installing mosaic flooring by fitting small pieces of hardwood together—usually blocks or strips measuring up to ¾-inch in thickness—to form inlaid or overlaid patterns, which are typically geometric and frequently incorporate a variety of species or finishes. Originally inspired by marquetry—the process of configuring elaborately…

Peanut Shell

Peanut shell refers to figuring that can be found when wood has an already quilted or blistered figure and is then cut on a rotary saw. A veneer with peanut shell figuring will appear to be bumpy, wavy, or pitted, when it is in fact a flat surface. It is…

Pecky

Explore Materials and Sample When wood has a localized area of decay or infection on the growth rings, the veneer may show a pecky figuring. It can commonly be found when they infected wood is cut on a rotary saw. Pecky wood figuring is visible on a veneer as an…

Perkins and Will Precautionary List

The Perkins & Will Precautionary List is a compilation of hazardous chemicals that are used in the building, design, and construction industry. The list was developed by Perkins & Will, an architecture and planning firm whose aim is to provide industry professionals with a tool to analyze the health and…

Pin Stripe

Pin stripe refers to a wood figuring in which the grain lines are thin, appear uniform, and are placed closely together. Wood that is rift sawn will commonly have pin stripe figuring.…

Pith

The pith is the center of the tree that is typically recognized by a change in wood-grain color, which darkens with age. Pith is considered to be an unstable part of the wood that has a greater tendency to crack.…

Plain Sawn

Explore Materials and Sample Plain sawn, also referred to as “flat sawn,” is the most common cut of lumber found and the most cost-effective way to mill a log. The technique consists of cutting parallel through the log, yielding wider planks with minimal waste. The annular rings on plain sawn…

Pommele

Pommele is a blister-like wood figure that resembles the look of light rain on a puddle. It is comprised of a dense pattern of irregular shaped rings that envelop one another. This figuring is found commonly in the sapele species.…

Post-Consumer Recycled

Explore Materials and Sample Post-consumer recycled content is material waste generated after the consumer-use phase of an item’s life cycle that is used to manufacture new products. To claim post-consumer content, manufacturers must disclose the percentage of recycled materials used, according to the item’s total weight. Use of either kind…

Post-Industrial Recycled

Explore Materials and Sample Post-industrial recycled content, also known as pre-consumer recycled content, is material waste generated during mass production that is later used to manufacture new products. Unlike post-consumer recycled content, post-industrial material has been recycled before entering into contact with consumers and being sent to a landfill. In…

Product Life Cycle

A product life cycle is an assessment of resource consumption, performance, and environmental impacts at each phase of an industrial product’s life. It consists of the extraction of raw materials, the processing of those materials, manufacturing, shipping, use, maintenance, and finally disposal or recycling. Life cycle assessment is based on…

Quarter Sawn

Explore Materials and Sample Quarter sawn, or quarter sawing, refers to a type of cutting technique used when rip-sawing lumber. The lumber is cut at an angle so that the annular growth rings intersect the face of the board. The angle’s exact number varies between 45 and 90 degrees. When…

Random Match

Random match is created by deliberately adjoining wood veneers of different width sizes and grain patterns to create a randomized design. It gives the appearance of solid wood and accentuates the grain and color of each panel. Creating a random pattern yields minimal waste as it maximizes the amount of…

REACH Substances of Very High Concern

REACH Substances of Very High Concern (SVHCs) are chemicals that pose a serious threat to human health and the environment, as evaluated by the European Chemical Agency (ECHA). They are regulated through the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization, and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH), a European Union law instated in 2007. The SVHC…

Reclaimed Wood

Explore Materials and Sample Reclaimed wood is structurally sound wood that has been salvaged from a building project and reused to extend its lifespan. When buildings are decommissioned, abandoned, or slated for demolition, intact components can be recovered through a dismantling process to be used in new construction or remodeling.…

Reconstituted Wood

Explore Materials and Sample Reconstituted wood, or wood veneers, are wood sheets that are rotary sawn, applied to one another, and finished to have the appearance of various desired woods. A consistent color, pattern, and aesthetic of a desired wood is applied, and each is made to be identical from…

Recycled Content

Explore Materials and Sample Recycled content, as opposed to virgin stock, is material that has been diverted from a landfill and subsequently used in the manufacturing of new product. Defined by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to prevent false marketing claims, recycled content can be supplied from industrial or consumer…
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